'September 11ths should assess and renew our defenses against Islamo-Fascism'- Daniel Greenfield

The dwindling number of ceremonies that commemorate the  jihadist attacks on NYC and Washington, September 11, 2001 typically focus as a memorial for victims: the first-responders among the nearly 3,000 Americans killed by the plane crashes. In the 16-years since the terror attacks, Islamist and leftist advocacy enterprises have shifted the focus away from the political Islam ("Islamism") motive of the al-Qaeda civilian attackers to terrorize Americans (and the on-looking world) to fear Islam and submit to it- religiously, culturally, and politically. Liberals intentionally conflate Islam and Islamism to make the criticizing of Islamism or Islamist politics (be they Islamist immigration into the West or the Muslim quest to liberate Jews from Israel - to rejoin a state of Muslim Palestine with the global Caliphate) as racist and taboo.

Not all Muslims are Islamist, but all Islamists are motivated by orthodox Islam- and to inhibit criticizing the Islamist movement to Islamize the world is to imperil the West's defenses to it. Westerners who came of age in the past 16-years are not commonly exposed to the motivations of the attackers. Manhattan journalist, Daniel Greenfield, who was affected by the 2001 attack, addresses the issue in a series of essays and exclusive interview he conducted with Democracy Broadcasting from the 9/11 Memorial Ceremony in Beverly Hills, California. 

"Everything I Needed to Know About Islam I Learned on 9/11  How September 11 made me what I am." by Daniel Greenfield, FrontPage Magazine, September 11, 2017 

Mr. Greenfield  reads from his essay in this interview, conducted in the 9/11 Memorial Garden in Beverly Hills, following the Beverly Hills Fire Department's 9/11 Memorial Ceremony at dusk. Article is excerpted below. 

"In the years since 2001, I have seen that look on the faces of countless leftists who ignore the stabbers shouting, “Allahu Akbar” in London or the terrorist declaring, "In the name of Allah, the merciful," among the bloody ruin of a gay nightclub in Orlando. Instead they focus on their mindless slogans.

“NO WAR,” “Stop Islamophobia” and “Refugees Welcome.” The world of the cardboard sign and the simple slogan is an easier and neater one than a sky filled with the ashes of the dead.

On September 11, some of us opened our eyes. Others closed them as hard as they could.

That Tuesday irrevocably divided my generation. Some joined the military, the police or became analysts. Others turned left-wing activists, volunteered as lawyers for terrorists or converted to Islam.

The passengers on Flight 93 who took the lead were in their thirties. But the two firefighters who made it to the 78th floor of the South Tower, Ronald Bucca, who did duty in Vietnam as a Green Beret, and Orio Palmer, a marathon runner, were in their forties. Those men and women had the most meaningful answers to the old question, “Where were you when it happened?” I was just one of countless people moving upstream away from Ground Zero.

The great lesson of that Tuesday morning was that it wasn’t over. It wasn’t over when we understood that we wouldn’t find anyone alive in that twisted mass of metal and death. It wasn’t over when the air began to clear. It wasn’t over when the President of the United States spoke. It wasn’t over when the planes began to fly again and the TV switched from non-stop coverage of the attacks and back to its regularly scheduled programming. It wasn’t over when we were told to mourn and move on.

It still isn’t over. After every attack, Boston, Orlando, San Bernardino, New York, Paris, Manchester, London, Barcelona, we are encouraged to mourn and move on. Bury the bodies, shed a tear and forget about
it. Terrible things happen. And we have to learn to accept them.

But Tuesday morning was not a random catastrophe. It did not go away because we went back to shopping. It did not go away with Hope and Change. Appeasing and forgetting only made it stronger.

Everything I needed to know about Islam, I learned on September 11. The details of the theology came later. I couldn’t quote the Koran while the sirens were wailing. But I learned the essential truth.  And so did you."

Mr. Greenfield assesses America's misplaced politically-correct reluctance to address Islamism and how it inhibits our cultural defense to Islamo-Fascist influence.

Read the rest of the article on The Point on FrontPage Magazine.

The Right 9/11 Memorial by Daniel Greenfield in The Point, Sept 11, 2017"The terrorists and the memorial-makers have a common purpose-- to make us forget what we are capable of. To drown us in our own pain and grief, to make us drink of the Lethe waters of reflecting pools until we forget who we are. The terrorists and the memorials have done their best to break us. But it is not in grief that we must remember the day. Grief is for the foregone conclusion. But though thousands upon thousands are lost-- we are not yet lost. And the war is not over.

The holes in the ground are not symbols of grief, or empty places in our hearts, they are open wounds inflicted on us by our enemies. Filling them with water will not change that, only anesthetize the pain of a fatal injury. To forget that is to sink into a mirage and die in delirium that we are recovering.

The attacks of September 11 are not a time for reflection, or personal remembrance, but a sharp reminder that we are bleeding. And we can only bleed for so long before we die. There are worse things out there than four hijacked planes used as missiles. There are actual missiles and suitcase nukes, nerve gas, toxins and whatever else can be dredged out of laboratories by Western trained researchers.

L.A.F.D holds 9/11 Memorial Service for Police, LAFD, and cadets

And even worse than these is the endless struggle, the constant waiting for another attack, the security measures meant to keep us safe while imprisoning us in our own security, the waiting for the day when an attack succeeds. The day we die.

September 11 is not the day we cry, it is the day we get angry. It is the day we remember who our killers were, how many have been lost, and how little has been done to bring down the ideology responsible as completely as they brought the towers down. It is the day we remember not to forget. It is the day we remember that the war has just begun and that until it ends, there can be no comfort or solace. The fight goes on."

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